TJ- Morrissey

EDUCATION

Robin Morrissey  robin_morrissey@dpsk12.org
Phone: 720.423.7071

Masters Degree: Master of Music Edu. (conducting emphasis)
University:  University of Colorado Boulder
Graduated: May, 2019
Bachelor of Science: Bachelor of Music Edu.
University:  University of Northern Colorado
Graduated: May, 1986
Certifications:

• Suzuki piano certification – University of Denver
• Kodaly certification – University of North Texas
• Orff certification – University of Northern Colorado
ENDORSEMENTS: Colorado Dept. Education
• Music (k-12)
• Spanish

Imagination is more important than knowledge.” -Einstein
Music is a higher revelation than all wisdom and philosophy.” -Beethoven


Life Before Thomas Jefferson High School

My parents enrolled me in piano lessons at the age of 5.  They were looking for a way to channel my energy and provide discipline and structure to my daily routine. Mom had read that the study of piano aids children’s reading and math skills, and anything that fostered and supplemented academic skills was encouraged.  Mom had an expectation that each of her children would study piano for at least two years, which my three siblings and I did. In my childhood homes (we moved 9 times) the piano was always placed in a room of the house in which the children were only allowed to enter if we were practicing music. I loved going into that room and practicing, especially on my own. When left alone to practice, I remember lining up my stuffed animals and pretending to give concerts.  I dreamed of being a concert pianist.

I began studying clarinet in fourth grade in the school’s beginning band. Mom and dad enrolled me in clarinet lessons.  My private clarinet teachers guided me through lessons in technique and the solo repertoire that came in useful for auditions for the all-state band and orchestra and later college. My band teachers were my inspiration and role models; in each of the four high schools I attended these teachers were the ones who I connected with the most strongly.  I loved the feeling of belonging I had in their classes and enjoyed how the music would stay with me throughout the day.  I enjoyed math and science classes, as well, and even considered studying math or engineering in college, but that feeling of being immersed in music was what I craved and that is the path I chose to follow.

Sharing my love of music seems natural.  Teaching is a part my family heritage — I am a fifth (maybe sixth) generation teacher.  Education was prized above all else in my childhood home.   Additionally, I have had the privilege of  studying with some of the finest music teachers, who have themselves studied with world class musicians. Two of my former piano teachers can trace their pedagogic lineage back to Beethoven.  I’d like to think I am continuing the legacies of my family and  teachers’, in sharing what they have given me with the next generation.